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Jul
25
2014
Jul 25, 2014

thingsthatwedo.com pic - organic cornCopyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

My family tries to be conscious about what we eat but there’s a limit to our clarity of what’s good for us amidst the confusion of all the information that is out there about what we should and shouldn’t eat and all the intricacies of all those details.

The reality is, arsenic has been found in rice. But, which rice grains are better? Which are worse? There’s BPA lining tin cans but is it only found in tin cans? There’s BHT in a ton of cereals, but which cereals?

Then, you hit the topic of GMO and my brain goes into a tornado of confusion with a capital C. I mean, there’s genetically modified food and then there’s non GMO foods but where does organic fit into all of this? Are organic foods automatically not GMO?
*head scratch*

Correction: *severe head scratching*


What’s up with GMO?

Truth of the matter is, I don’t know. Sure, I know the basics about genetically modified foods and I’d prefer to avoid them if at all possible but do I know all the details?

Nope.

And for good reason.

thingsthatwedo.com pic - nectarineI decided to go to some reputable online sources to learn some more details about this whole GM process. I’ve included the links below so you can do a little research for yourself.

Both the FDA and Health Canada website go into extended detail about definitions and the processes that go into labeling foods. As I did the research, I became even more confused. Did you know there’s a different between ‘genetically modified’ versus ‘genetically engineered’?

Yeah…I didn’t either.

As I did my digging, one thing became apparent: it looks as though there are certain crops like corn and soybean that are more likely to be genetically modified… and canola oil?

Forget it.

So, that’s one lesson I learned amidst the confusion: be aware of which plants tend to be more GM’d. Then make careful decisions about what you want to buy if those plants are involved.


What’s the Connection with Organic?

thingsthatwedo.com pic - strawberriesWell, I finally found a source that is extremely thorough and will probably take me another week to figure out but it’s a good one. The one thing I immediately learned is that both the United States and Canada regulations “do NOT allow companies to label products “100% / Certified Organic” if they contain genetically modified foods.” (source: gmo-awareness.com).

This particular post also goes into great detail about the different labels out there, from 100% organic to certified organic to crazy words like ‘usually’ and ‘naturally’.


Final Thoughts:

When all is said and done, I think it’s important for all of us to do our homework, me included. Part of the reason why this post is so vague is because I’m trying to decipher all that I’m reading. Rather than wait until I’ve processed it all I figured it’s better to share the links so we can all do our homework together.

One thing is certain: GM foods are coming to a grocery store near you whether you like it or not. It may be a GM food you’re eating or it could be an ingredient in a product that you’re buying. Thus, it’s up to us to learn more and make more conscious efforts to think twice before buying.

Note to self: rethink my use of corn starch!


Your Homework and mine: visit the links and learn more about all the GM stuff.

thingsthatwedo.com pic - pearIs Organic Always GMO Free? From gmo-awareness.com http://gmo-awareness.com/2011/05/05/is-organic-always-gmo-free/

From Health Canada: The Regulation of Genetically Modified Food

From the FDA: Questions & Answers on Food from Genetically Engineered Plants

Side note: the images I’ve used are of foods I’ve bought in the past  but I have NO idea if any of it is non GMO. Sigh…I have a lot of rethinking to do!

 

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