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Aug
11
2015
Aug 11, 2015

thingsthatwedo.com - aloe plants aug 2015Honestly, it doesn’t take much to make me happy. I really truly can’t wait to win the lotto to become happy. If I did that, I’d likely be miserable for the rest of my life and is just not going to work for me.

So, somewhere along the way I adopted a ‘glass half full’ type of mentality and I try to look for those ‘awww’ moments in everyday life. The other day it was the cat sleeping on its cozy little chair. Today, it’s my baby aloe plants.

By now, you have to know that I do not have a green thumb. Pals would disagree with me and comment about all the plants I have adopted but all I really do is water them and hope for the best (the aloe plant of long ago that actually burst when I touched it can attest to the fact that I do not have a green thumb). I say all this because it gives you a really good reference point to fully appreciate just how miraculous these baby aloe plants are.

Take a look at them. They continue to grow and I’ve been so paranoid about them. I worried that I might over water them from being too overzealous about their existence. Then, I worried that I might not water them enough. What if they needed more water to sustain themselves in that early life cycle? What if they needed more sun?

ACK! Too many thoughts, too many questions!

Luckily, the baby aloe plants are still thriving and I get a big goofy grin on my face whenever I look at those little grin bits pushing up from the soil. Part of me thinks the big aloe plant felt sorry for me and earlier aloe mishap and decided to give me a second chance.

thingsthatwedo.com - aloe plants july 2015

Well, I’ll take it, thank you very much!

Things to do: even if you don’t have a green thumb, green up your living space and get a few green plants. If I can do it, so can you!

p.s. in case you want to read my earlier post on the baby aloe plants, see link below:

No way! Baby Aloe Vera Plants!!!

Reminder: this post was written by and for thingsthatwedo.com only and reflects the opinion of one wee small family. If you see this post anywhere else except on my site at thingsthatwedo.com, know that I have not consented to having any part of this post (or this website for that matter), to be re-produced, copied, or re-printed anywhere else. Practice ethical posting!

Copyright© 2015 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

Jun
20
2015
Jun 20, 2015

thingsthatwedo.com pic - aloe vera June 2015You know, green thumbs – I don’t have them but they’re green in spirit. You see, I’m the one at work who saves plants that have seem better days. The yellow dried out looking plant that used to be green, the violets that were left astray, the wilted plant that really really needed some TLC. I’m not always successful (the orchid died and so did the one that had flowers) but on most occasions, they do come back to life. Needless to say, my office has a lot of great oxygen for me to enjoy.

Then, there was my aloe vera plant. I saw it at the store. I bought it. It came in to my office, just like all the others except I actually spent a few dollars on it. There were actually 2 aloe vera plants in one pot so I decided to give them each some space. I watered them about once a week as I would the others until something tragic happened. – Continue Reading

Apr
13
2015
Apr 13, 2015

thingsthatwedo.com pic - jade plant April 2015

Back in December 2014, I posted about a teeny weeny jade plant that grew from one of the petals that I had knocked off of a much bigger jade plant. Fast forward to April 2015 and I’m happy to report that said teeny weeny jade plant is growing growing growing!

Now, you all know by now that I don’t have a particularly green thumb. I don’t even know if jade plants have petals but that’s what I called that individual leaf or petal that I’d snapped off. So, given my lack of knowledge around said living things, I’m particularly happy to see how well it’s doing. It’s also pretty miraculous to see how big this teeny weeny jade plant has grown when you consider I could have easily thrown that leaf in the garbage. If I had done that, this teeny weeny jade plant would have never come into existence.

That thought process alone makes me incredibly grateful for life’s little random rainbows. Call me sentimental or silly but just looking at this teeny weeny jade plant makes me happier and more optimistic.

I think that’s the perfect way to end a perfect post for a perfect Monday leading to a perfect Tuesday which will lead to a perfect work week. Note: perfect doesn’t mean PERFECT. Perfect just means whatever you want it to mean with a positive twist.

I should make my own dictionary strictly for use on Mondays! 🙂

p.s. if you want to see what this jade plant looked like back in December 2014, see my earlier post by clicking below:

Life’s Little Miracles: A Teeny Weeny Jade Plant

Reminder: this post was written by and for thingsthatwedo.com only. If you see this post anywhere else except on my site at thingsthatwedo.com, know that I have not consented to having any part of this post (or this website for that matter), to be re-produced, copied, or re-printed anywhere else. Practice ethical posting!

Copyright© 2015 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

Feb
27
2015
Feb 27, 2015

thingsthatwedo.com pic - living stoneCopyright© 2015 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

A Living Stone plant, I should have known a plant with a name like that would be completely beyond my capacity to care for. When I was first at the florist shop, the Living Stone plant sounded completely simple to care for. All I had to do was give it some sun and water it infrequently. Okay, maybe those weren’t the exact words of the store owner but it’s a pretty good summary of what I heard.

That was back in October 2014. It’s now the tail end of February 2015 and the Living Stone plant is still alive so that’s a good thing. Not much has happened to it which I have to say is a little on the boring side. I mean, unlike other plants where you can see tiny new green leaves forming or flowers blooming, the Living Stone plant doesn’t really give me any clues about how it’s doing.

So, what did I do? – Continue Reading

Dec
3
2014
Dec 3, 2014

thingsthatwedo.com pic - jade plantCopyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

Those of you who regularly visit ThingsThatWeDo.com know that I do not have a green thumb. I love plants but I definitely do not have that innate ability to keep them alive and thriving.

Our family has had a Jade plant for a while now mainly because it’s easy to care for and it’s incredibly resilient. One day, I was doing some cleaning and ended up snapping off one of its petals. I felt terrible and didn’t want to throw it away so I decided to stick it back into the soil. I wasn’t sure if anything would happen to that snapped petal but I figured it was better than throwing it out. If nothing else, it would serve as fertilizer.

Well, time passes and I go about doing the usual stuff that life requires. Months pass and I decide to take a closer look at the Jade plant. That’s when I see this.

A little tiny Jade plant actually sprouted from that one snapped leaf! Holy moly! Talk about surprised, I had no idea it would really work but there it was staring at me. I don’t know how that little tiny Jade plant survived because I honestly didn’t do anything special to help it along.  Over the past few months, I continued to water the Jade plant but because it sits on a high shelf, I never took it down to see what was happening to that snapped petal. The snapped petal flopped off so I removed it before taking this photo.

I am stunned and speechless and completely in awe of that little teeny weeny plant. I called my daughter over to see it and she was just as fascinated by it as I was. That little Jade plant is the cutest thing I’ve seen in a very long time. Now that I know it’s there, my next project will be to get another pot and re-plant it so it has some space to grow since a big Jade plant is already living in its pot.

I reflect and think back to this small chain of events. If I hadn’t actually snapped off that one leaf from the Jade plant, I would have never witnessed the growth of this little Jade plant. If I had thrown out the petal, this little Jade plant would have never come to exist. A random set of events all leading up to this miraculous little Jade plant.

Seriously, that is pretty neat.

 

Reminder: this post was written by and for thingsthatwedo.com only. If you see this post anywhere else except on my site at thingsthatwedo.com, know that I have not consented to having any part of this post (or this website for that matter), to be re-produced, copied, or re-printed anywhere else. Practice ethical posting!

Oct
21
2014
Oct 21, 2014

thingsthatwedocom. pic - lemongrass oct 2014Copyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

It’s now October 2014 and guess what? The lemongrass is still alive. In fact, the lemongrass is a monstrosity in my garden at this point and I’m not quite sure what to do with it. The lemongrass has grown so tall that I wasn’t even really sure how to take a photo of it for this post so this is what I’m left with.

What I can tell you is that the lemongrass didn’t grow the way I thought it would. Actually, I have no idea what I thought would happen but I envisioned that I’d have lemongrass that resembled the stuff I buy at my local grocery store, you know, those pale bulbous stalks. Well, my lemongrass is certainly tall and towers over me and it’s got leaves that have dangerous edges that warn you well in advance not to run your fingers along them or you’re sure to get a nice serrated ghastly cut. The stalks have grown more robust but they’re about the width of one chopstick at most and they have a brownish tint to them.

Confused, I asked a pal of mine who eats a lot of lemongrass. According to her, she told me not to consume the leaves (that’s a no brainer) or I’m sure to cut my tongue right off (again, another no brainer). She said the stalks are still young and have a long way to go. My next comment, “but it’s going to be winter soon”.

Her response, “they’ll be fine.”

Uh…not sure if I should believe her. She said I could eat the stalks now but they won’t have much flavour since they are so young. She said I could chop off the stalk and leave the roots and they’ll grow again next year.

Uh…still not sure if I should believe her but at this point, I’m still too chicken to eat the lemongrass and I’m too busy to deal with all those sharp nasty looking leaves anyway so for the time being, they’re still in my garden. Everything else has pretty much gone kaputs but the lemongrass is still quite happy to be out there in the cool autumn weather.

What I can tell you is that the lemongrass I grew indoors is ready for the garbage. They did grow a bit taller but look like nothing more than tall wisps of grass that I neglected to cut over the summer which is probably a good thing now that I’ve seen how unfriendly the leaves can be.

thingsthatwedo.com pic - lemongrassLong story short: lemongrass lived despite this being the first time I’ve ever grown it so that in itself is a miracle since I’ve officially killed rosemary twice.  I mean, take a look at what I started out with! That’s impressive, you have to admit.

Who knows what I’m going to do with this lemongrass but it’s definitely still alive!

 

Reminder: this post was written by and for thingsthatwedo.com only. If you see this post anywhere else except on my site at thingsthatwedo.com, know that I have not consented to having any part of this post (or this website for that matter), to be re-produced, copied, or re-printed anywhere else. Practice ethical posting!

Oct
14
2014
Oct 14, 2014

thingsthatwedo.com pic - living stoneCopyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

Green thumb, I do not have. I recently killed a Sansevieria plant and an aloe vera plant (I over watered them. The aloe vera actually burst when I touched it, no joke) so when I say I don’t have a green thumb, I’m completely serious. Anything that can survive in my vicinity is most definitely a hearty plant.

And yet…I’m intrigued by plants and I often am mesmerized by their magic and beauty. Guess what I took home the other day?

Living stone, anyone?

Cool, huh?

thingsthatwedo.com pic - living stoneI’d never seen one before. I had no idea what it was.  I passed by a local flower shop and came across these little plants and they were SO different. I stood there staring at them. Eventually, the florist came out and told me they were called “Living Stone”, a type of succulent plant. Until she said the word, I didn’t even know ‘succulent’ plants existed or if I did, I certainly didn’t know they went by that name.

The Living Stone was too interesting to pass up so I took it home with me.  It’s a dainty little thing that looks like a cross between a brain and an odd crinkly rock of some sort. According to the florist, the Living Stone is very easy to care for. I’m supposed to water it very infrequently (translation: my potential disaster). I believe her exact words were ‘only water it when the Living Stone is about to split’ and maybe something about watering only twice a month at most.

thingsthatwedo.com pic - living stoneOkay…I really don’t know if I’ll be able to do this but the Living Stone is by far one of the coolest plants I’ve ever seen. Since coming home, I’ve done a little research and I think I’m in trouble. If I’m going to take really good care of this Living Stone plant, I might have to be mindful of the different seasons, the growing periods, and a bunch of other factors.

What have I gotten myself into?

Reminder: this post was written by and for thingsthatwedo.com only. If you see this post anywhere else except on my site at thingsthatwedo.com, know that I have not consented to having any part of this post (or this website for that matter), to be re-produced, copied, or re-printed anywhere else. Practice ethical posting!

Oct
9
2014
Oct 9, 2014

thingsthatwedo.com pic - rootsCopyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

The other day I was pulling out some plants from our garden. I can’t remember what plant it was anymore but there I was, yanking it out from our wee little garden patch. As I was doing this, I came across THIS.

WHAT IS THAT?

I have no idea. I don’t have a big green thumb but I’ve seen a few roots in my lifetime and I’ve never seen THAT before. On this one particular root, there appears to be an added growth and it happens to look like a 6 fingered gecko’s foot or something. Call me a green thumb newbie but I’ve never seen anything like it.

thingsthatwedo.com pic - rootsIf anyone even remotely knows what it might be, let me know. I’m curious, fascinated, and kind of freaked out all at the same time.

*scratches head*

Nope, I still can’t figure it out.

 

Reminder: this post was written by and for thingsthatwedo.com only. If you see this post anywhere else except on my site at thingsthatwedo.com, know that I have not consented to having any part of this post (or this website for that matter), to be re-produced, copied, or re-printed anywhere else. Practice ethical posting!

Sep
24
2014
Sep 24, 2014

thingsthatwedo.com pic - rosemary 2014Copyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

No, this is NOT how my rosemary plant looks now.

I have a confession. I should have posted this a while ago but I didn’t. Remember that one lonely rosemary plant that I picked up this year as part of our yearly gardening project? Yeah…well, it’s gone, done, kaput, blop, blip, bloop. Whatever you want to call it, the rosemary plant has decomposed and is nothing more than fertilizer for my garde at this point.

I think I’ve come to a conclusion that rosemary and I are destined never to be together.

I should have taken a picture of the tragedy but I didn’t. Rest assured I’m not lying when I say the rosemary plant is a goner. This is not the first rosemary to flop in our home. You see, our family does like rosemary and we’ll often use it in different dishes that we make to give it that extra kick. Buying and nurturing a rosemary plant seemed like a natural and relatively easy thing to do.

NOT.

I must be doing something wrong with the rosemary plants. After 2 failed attempts in 2 different years, I think I’ll try again next year but I’ll do things a little differently. I mean, there’s no point pining over this abysmal failure. I think it’s best to analyze the situation and move on to avoid making the same mistakes, right?

Next year, I think I’ll plant my rosemary outdoors. Both failed plants were in pots that I kept indoors by the window. My dear neighbor has a rosemary plant that is absolutely thriving and is still happily outdoors bigger than ever. Maybe the poor rosemary plant just needed a little extra outdoor love that I wasn’t garden-smart enough to provide? I certainly think I watered it plenty so the only thing I can think to change is its location.

Oh well, better luck next year.

 

Reminder: this post was written by and for thingsthatwedo.com only. If you see this post anywhere else except on my site at thingsthatwedo.com, know that I have not consented to having any part of this post (or this website for that matter), to be re-produced, copied, or re-printed anywhere else. Practice ethical posting!

Sep
9
2014
Sep 9, 2014

thingsthatwedo.com pic - radishes 2014Copyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

Loyal readers of ThingsThatWeDo.com, you know by now that I don’t have much of a green thumb. I’m adventurous (sort of) but green thumb is not something I can add to my resume with confidence. Yet, I would say that I’m at least willing to persevere. To date, I’ve learned that tomatoes seem to be the most forgiving and that I have no snap pea sense whatsoever.

Then there are these beets and radishes.

Where did they come from?

Well, think of them as more of a science experiment than anything else. It goes something like this:

Random soil that isn’t in use. Use said random soil. Add radish seeds and beet seeds. Water regularly and hope for the best. Fast forward and this is what we get.

thingsthatwedo.com pic - beets 2014That’s pretty much what we did. The plants grew and grew but we had no idea what was happening underneath the soil so we decided to give them all a yank and this is the result.

I have to say, my daughter and I were quite impressed. We never thought we’d get any radishes or beets from this random series of events but lo and behold, there they were. The radishes were a beautifully vibrant pink while the beets had their signature maroon hue.

Gardening can be pretty fun, especially when you see the results!

Reminder: this post was written by and for thingsthatwedo.com only.  If you see this post anywhere else except on my site at thingsthatwedo.com, know that I have not consented to having any part of this post (or this website for that matter), to be re-produced, copied, or re-printed anywhere else.  Practice ethical posting!

© 2015 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.