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Jun
30
2014
Jun 30, 2014
Posted in: Thoughts

thingsthatwedo.com pic - rainbowCopyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

Haha, that is the title of today’s post. If you regularly follow ThingsThatWeDo.com, you’ll know I’m not the most technologically savvy. I’m not a big user of Facebook (I have an account but you know I don’t update it often). We have a Twitter account which I rarely use (I got it to make sure no one else did) and I still prefer pen and paper. I don’t call myself Techno Turtle for nothing.

Then it happened: I got locked out of my cellphone. It wasn’t completely my fault. In fact, I’d say it was all planned to be. I was on my way to work, one fine day, but got turned back (environmental, physical reasons beyond my control). So, I decide to walk back home and do some work. I put said cellphone on my desk just in case anyone calls.

An hour later, I’m ready to brave the commute and by the time I’m on route, I realize I’ve left the cell phone at home and decide NOT to go home to get it.

On this same day, a good pal of mine gets lost and needs a phone number so I try to get the hubby to access my phone remotely. Not a good idea. Now, I’m locked out and instead of the usual screen to enter my password, I get a screen I’ve never seen before.

Don’t know why, don’t know how. It just happened. - Continue Reading

Jun
29
2014
Jun 29, 2014

thingsthatwedo.com pic - lemongrassCopyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

When our family bought the little container of lemongrass, we were instructed to plant them about an inch or so apart. The only problem was, they were all clumped together and when we first bought them, the lemongrass looked too frail to ripped apart.

So, my daughter and I decided we’d split some apart and planted them in the outdoor garden while we kept some in a little pot indoors. It was our own little experiment: would the outdoor lemongrass do better or would our indoor lemongrass win?

Here are a few photos of our lemongrass that we took a little while ago.

Based on what we can see, it appears that the outdoor lemongrass has taken on a slightly darker and duller colour than the indoor lemongrass which seems a bit more vibrant green. Both look healthy and are certainly alive and well but the colour is noticeably different.

thingsthatwedo.com pic - lemongrassGiven that gardening isn’t my forte, I have no idea why the lemongrass is different. Possible reasons that I can think of: differences in the soil, lighting, amount of water? Who knows.

One thing is for sure though: the lemongrass still has quite a way to go before it resembles the lemongrass you’d normally buy in the grocery store.

I honestly wonder if it’ll get that far. I guess only time will tell!

 

Reminder: this post was written by and for thingsthatwedo.com only. If you see this post anywhere else except on my site at thingsthatwedo.com, know that I have not consented to having any part of this post (or this website for that matter), to be re-produced, copied, or re-printed anywhere else. Practice ethical posting!

Jun
28
2014
Jun 28, 2014
Posted in: Thoughts

thingsthatwedo.com pic - summer 2012 nature sceneCopyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

It’s officially summer and school is officially over for the year. I’m shocked, stunned, and surprised. Another academic year has come and gone. The weather is finally looking up and I can’t wait to spend the weekends together at a much slower and more relaxed pace.

You see, we’re a lazy family. Sleeping in is a beautiful thing. Bike rides? Awesome. Parks, playgrounds, hikes (just avoid anything that looks like Giant Hogweed!)? All amazing. For us, summer is about being together and enjoying every moment at that slow relaxed pace. Roller coaster? Nah, no thanks.

Oh, and don’t forget – you need a really good book to keep you company too. That goes year round!

This post is dedicated to all our readers at ThingsThatWeDo.com. Enjoy the summer. We’ll continue to post daily because there’s always something to talk about!

Reminder: this post was written by and for thingsthatwedo.com only. If you see this post anywhere else except on my site at thingsthatwedo.com, know that I have not consented to having any part of this post (or this website for that matter), to be re-produced, copied, or re-printed anywhere else. Practice ethical posting!

Jun
27
2014
Jun 27, 2014

thingsthatwedo.com - Paderno Eco Pan - ceramic coating and non-stickCopyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

Remember my Paderno pan? It’s been ages since I’ve mentioned either of my Paderno pans. Of all the reviews I’ve done over the past few years, the Paderno pan reviews seem to generate the most buzz. Now, for what it’s worth, I still have both my Paderno Ecopan and my Paderno Nature Trust pan. Both are in good working condition but they do signs of wear and tear. They no longer have their pristine unused look but still hold up to their ‘non-stick’ purpose.

Over the past little while, I’ve been in touch with one particular reader who I’ll call “M”. We ended up having a very interesting conversation about Paderno pans. One thing I learned is that Paderno pans aren’t all made in Canada. Some seem to be made in Indonesia and others are made in China. I know mine were made in Canada. Could that have something to do with how well the Paderno pans work? It’s certainly a point to consider given that some Paderno owners seem to love their pans while others seem quite ready to throw them out the window. If I were Paderno, I’d do a little product evaluation and consider this variable when doing their quality analysis. - Continue Reading

Jun
26
2014
Jun 26, 2014
Posted in: Recipes

thingsthatwedo.com pic - rice paper rollsCopyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

I’ve eaten them at restaurants. I’ve eaten them at parties, but I’ve never made them myself.

The dreaded rice paper. You know, the kind you use to make rice paper rolls. They look like little plastic discs that somehow magically turn into these soft edible delicacies once you soak them in a little hot water and cram them with your choice of yummy fixings.

You see, it all SOUNDS simple enough but they also look tedious, time consuming, and downright scary.

Of course, some big kid encouragement can do wonders. My daughter has wanted to make her own rice paper rolls for the longest time and finally we managed to brave it. First we bought the rice paper which promptly stayed unused in our pantry for a few weeks.

Then, we got down to business.

I can be lacking of courage, at times. - Continue Reading

Jun
25
2014
Jun 25, 2014

Copyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

Yep, recalls seem to be an ongoing mess around here. The good news is, we’re all staying informed, which reminds me – have you read up on Giant Hogweed yet? You should if you haven’t!

1. Recall in Canada: Lazy One recalls children’s bathrobes Reason for Recall: does not meet flammability requirements. Click here to read more.

2. Recall in Canada but also sold in United States: Building Products of Canada Corp. recalls Gripgard SX self-adhesive waterproofing membranes Reason for Recall: the top part of the self-adhesive has sand which can come off during the installation process. Translation: slippery dangers. Uh..not my idea of fun. Click here to read more.

3. Recall in Canada: Intertek warns of a counterfeit certification mark on LED lamps Reason for Recall: fake certification means the product may not be up to standard. Worst part is, the number of units sold is unknown and time period that there were sold is also unknown. Best to check out the product images to make sure you don’t have any in your home! Click here to read more.

4. Joint Recall – Canada: Saint-Benoît-du-Lac brand Le Moutier Ripened Firm Goat Cheese Reason for Recall: possibly distributed across Canada, this one is a little creepy because the product is contaminated with Staphylococcus. That’s right, not Listeria, not Salmonella. Staphylococcus. Click here to read more.

5. Recall – Canada and the United States: Stile Products recalls Tern Folding Bicycles Reason for Recall: well, let’s see, if I read the recall correctly, the identified bikes may actually crack at one of the hinges which poses a fall hazard and yes, there have been incidents reported! lick here to read more.

6. Recall – Canada: Health Canada issues recall of unauthorized health product: “Cellfood” Reason for Recall: labeling issue. Now, that sounds like a silly reason to issue a recall but it’s not. The main reason for the recall of the identified products is because it’s carrying an 8-digit natural health product number (NPN80004392) was actually issued for a different product. See the implications? Click here to read more.

7. Recall – Canada: Spiderman Water Bottle Reason for Recall: choking hazard. The Spiderman is attached with 3 screws that can come off. Not a lot were sold but it’s good to be mindful of these potential hazards when buying goodies for your child! Click here to read more.

DO YOU HAVE A COMPLAINT ABOUT A PRODUCT?

Health Canada – how you can report a consumer product. If you experience an incident with a consumer product, you need to know how to report it. Click here to read more.

Stay tuned to ThingsThatWeDo.com. We’ll continue to keep you all posted of product recalls and safety tips!

Let others know about these recalls: it!

Jun
24
2014
Jun 24, 2014

thingsthatwedo.com pic - nature child drawingCopyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

Call me paranoid but I believe information is empowering. A little while ago, I had heard about Giant Hogweed, an awful plant that is incredibly dangerous to us humans. I intended to post about it earlier but somehow forgot until a friend reminded me.

Why am I making such a big deal about it?

Well, for starters, it’s incredibly toxic. From what I’ve learned so far, if your skin comes into contact with Giant Hogweed, you are in for a huge shock. Within 24 – 48 hours, we’re talking burns, blisters, and possible permanent scarring. The sap is photoreactive, which means it reacts with sunlight. Of the different videos and articles that I’ve read so far, your skin continues to be in danger when exposed to sunlight for up to 10 years.

Translation: every time that part of your skin gets exposed to sunlight, the blisters, burns come back.

Get the toxic sap in your eyes and we’re talking the possibility of permanent blindness.

Apparently, the Giant Hogweed loves river banks and can be found on road sides. Now, when it’s fully grown, the Giant Hogweed can be up to 15 feet high and at that size, you can’t miss it. That’s not what I’m worried about. For me, the idea that shorter younger Giant Hogweed plants might be harder to see. Worst part is, the Giant Hogweed seems to be quite enticing to young children who may see its giant hollow stalk and want to use it as a telescope or pea shooter. Imagine: your pet runs through an area and may/not have come into contact with Giant Hogweed. Based on what I’ve read so far, your pet will be fine but you won’t be if you now touch it with your bare hands.

Gosh, that imagery just gives me the creeps.

Different countries are trying to eradicate the Giant Hogweed but it isn’t easy. Turns out, each plant gives off thousands of seeds and based on what I’ve read so far, the seeds can stay active for up to 15 years. Man, that’s nuts!!!

Your homework and mine: to learn all we can about Giant Hogweed and avoid it at all costs.

I personally don’t have any images of Giant Hogweed that I can post on our site, ThingsThatWeDo.com but if you do a quick online search, you’ll find tons of videos and images. I’ve also included a few choice videos and articles for you to get you started.

Call me paranoid if you want but I think it’s better to know more than less because knowledge = safety especially when it comes to this Giant Hogweed plant  and the safety of our children. In case you’re wondering, the hubby and I have talked to our big kid about the Giant Hogweed plant. She’s watched some videos and we’ve talked about some safety protocols (i.e. we can go on hikes but we’ll avoid touching the plants and will likely stay on cleared paths), and she’s already planning to tell her teacher when she gets to school tomorrow. We also learned more about the shape of its leaves and what to look out for.

Now, if one kid can do all that, imagine what we could all do collectively?

Here are a few links you can click to learn more about the Giant Hogweed:

National Post: Giant weed that burns and blinds spreads across Canada

Giant Hogweed – Ministry of Natural Resources

Weedinfo.ca – a great website to help figure out what weed is what

United States Department of Agriculture, National Agriculture Library: National Invasive Species Information Center – Giant Hogweed

Reminder: this post was written by and for thingsthatwedo.com only. If you see this post anywhere else except on my site at thingsthatwedo.com, know that I have not consented to having any part of this post (or this website for that matter), to be re-produced, copied, or re-printed anywhere else. Practice ethical posting!

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Jun
23
2014
Jun 23, 2014

thingsthatwedo.com - staedtler pencil crayonsCopyright© 2014 ThingsThatWeDo.com. All Rights Reserved.

I think it’s safe to say that regular readers of ThingsThatWeDo.com know that I’m not a big fan of shopping. In fact, I abhor it. I hate the crowds, I hate the excessive consumerism mentality which goes against every lazy bone that I have in my body, and I definitely hate spending money.

Having said that, I do like to keep my eyes open for a good deal because it reduces the amount of time I have to waste on shopping.

Do I sound like I’m making no sense whatsoever?

Allow me to provide you all with a concrete example of how I shop. - Continue Reading

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